A Rube’s Wisdom

Like Ranger’s Oath and Garden Tended before it this is a poem well known in the fantasy world of Talarin. It is supposed to be a poem that teaches a lesson, taught to young people or shared when we are busy missing the forest for the trees.

 

Once there was a rube

A simple country man

He was low on wisdom

But could work most any land

 

A farmer from his birth

Master of his trade

His King did call to war

And then a warrior made

 

Low of birth and slow

His “betters” took their mirth

By barbs of words and cruelty

And questioning his worth

 

Never did he complain

Not once did he retort

He would just smile and nod

Then head back to his work

 

Tragedy befell his troop

And in their darkest hour

The rube saved all of them

But not with martial power

 

The enemy devised a trap

To lay the army low

Simple and yet devious

Death would come below

 

The general of the king

Was driven and quite smart

Tactics were his foray

He was a master of his art

 

Yet he was also prideful

Which portends a fall

The plan was just too simple

He couldn’t see it at all

 

The rube noticed the tactic

And spoke up right away

When the general saw the trap

The army won the day

 

After their enemies were bested

The general met with rube

And he asked him how he missed

A plan that was so crude

 

The rube thought for a moment

Stopped and rubbed his chin

Then spoke with his soft drawl

And surprised them once again

 

“Sometimes the best things in life

Are the simplest of them all

Others might not see them

Because they are too small”

 

“For men like you and them

High up in your towers

You might see all the sky

But you’ll miss all the flowers”

 

His words confused quite deeply

With a smile spread across his face

When they returned home

He was offered the King’s grace

 

The rube only took some land

And some animals to graze

He returned to his simple life

A farmer for the rest of days

 

He could have been a lord

With a manor and real power

The rube just smiled and stated

“But then I’d miss the flowers”

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